Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Wisdom Wednesday #22 - Passover Seder


Passover ended Monday at sundown.  Our seder was wonderful, as always.  Here are some photos from our precious time with mishpocha (family).  Learn more about Passover by clicking on the link on the left side of this blog. 












For Elijah
Lighting the candles to begin


The men sang "Pharoah-Pharoah"
He found the affikomen



And Rabbi Jem had to pay up!


Looking for Elijah - who wasn't there



frogs! frogs! frogs!






If you ever attend a seder, you'll know why this game is so appropriate.  Hint:  Read Exodus 8:1-3
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Spiritual Sunday
Let's Get Social Sunday



Modest Mom Monday Link-up 

A Wise Woman Builds
Whole Hearted Wednesday 
Wake Up Wednesday
Whimsical Wednesday

Hearts for Home
Favorite Things 

4 comments:

  1. I laughed at the frogs! What a nice Passover.

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    1. Blessings to you. Thanks for stopping by and for your kind comment.

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  2. The filled plate for Elijah pictured above.....does that signify Messiah has come so the plate is filled now? Just curious & trying to learn. I read somewhere that the traditional Seder for Jews who don't recognize Messiah has come, prepare an empty place setting & a filled wine glass for Elijah who is expected to come at Passover and announce Messiah's coming. When the children look & don't see Elijah, the wine is poured out. Thank you for your patience with all my questions. Love reading your posts, and the pictures really help pull it together for this Gentile Christian.

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  3. My husband, Rabbi Jem, who grew up as a conservative Jew said they always set the plate as pictured. It does not signify anything mysterious or hidden. It is following tradition of the Jews which have been passed down for generations.

    I'm always happy to answer any questions, and I'm glad you're seeking to understand the beauty of Judaism. You will be blessed as you obey G-d's Word, and blessed also to participate in Jewish traditions.

    Shalom,
    GiGi

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